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Web Development

Testing CSS Algorithms!!!!!!! Part 2 [WiH]

In part 2 of this enthusiastically titled mini series, we will set up some test methods in JavaScript. Next will be the test itself! Maybe I’ll write that tomorrow, maybe not…

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Web Development

Designgineering Chronicles: Months 6.5-8.5, Part 2

And here is Part 2! Read this for technical notes about how the Cantaloupe pattern architecture is working out, examples of CSS algorithms, and (for us) the solved problem of JavaScript.

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Updates Web Development

Designgineering Chronicles [WiH]: The Third Month

It’s time for the third installment of Designgineering Chronicles! This one is a long one and written in major haste, so buckle up. Lots of good things about job titles, CSS standards, JavaScript, perfectionism, and the joys of refactoring.

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Research Web Development

Enumerability in JavaScript, or “why some properties are dimmed in a console.log”

I’d seen dimmed properties before, and I always thought of them as the properties that are there by default, or ones I’m not supposed to manipulate. It turns out that’s pretty much correct. The technical term for that is that dimmed properties are non-enumerable vs. enumerable properties.

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Research Web Development

Notes from Kyle Simpson, My JavaScript Spirit Guide

A few key takeaways from the course “Deep JS Foundations” on Frontend Masters, taught by Kyle Simpson who I now declare my JavaScript Spirit Guide.

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Research

Day 4: Data Structures – I Made a Hash Table

Apart from hashtags, my association with hashes is encrypting passwords in a database. That association is correct in terms of what a hash is, but there are also hash tables, hash functions, hash maps, and oh my gosh, more hash things for sure. Let’s focus on a hash function and a hash table and building a rudimentary one in JavaScript.

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Research

Day 1: Data Structures – Linked Lists

Linked lists are very similar to arrays in that they are a one-dimensional list of elements. Unlike arrays, however, in a linked list, you cannot just jump to index 4, you have to walk through the list, starting with the “head”, or the first element in the list, and work your way through to the fourth element. They are very useful for lists where you need to add/remove elements, but not so useful if you need to search elements.

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Thoughts

JavaScript and Me

JavaScript and I have had a rocky relationship over the past few years. My consulting work doesn’t really require a deep understanding of JavaScript, but my newfound resolve to level-up my skills and to obtain a full-time job have deemed that deep understanding quite necessary.